The OneShift Blog


The Top 10 Part-Time Jobs for Students

  Thursday 24 April, 2014   0 Comment(s)

 

There are many part-time jobs for university students - just a quick glance at OneShift will prove this. Part-time or casual jobs are good options for students because they are flexible enough to allow an individual time both for studying and earning money. Part-time jobs can also provide an individual with valuable skills for their future career. With so many part-time jobs out there, we have made a shortlist of the top ten casual jobs for students:

 

1. Bartenders: Working at a bar requires a RSA (Responsible Service of Alcohol Certificate) and RCG (Responsible Conduct of Gambling Certificate) but these are relatively cheap and easy to obtain. The course for both certificates usually lasts a day and costs around $200. Bar work is great for students as the shifts are usually at night and on the weekends - outside of university hours. The pay is also good -  $20-25 an hour with extra if your hours are late at night or on Sunday. Lastly, it's relatively easy, social work. You get to speak with the bar locals, university students and foreign travelers.

 

2. Wait staff: Working in a restaurant or a cafe is a good option for students as businesses in the hospitality sector hire regularly and there are often many part-time and casual positions available. Hours are usually in the morning, lunch time or dinner - usually for no more than four hours depending on what meal you are helping with. The pay is usually not as good as bar work however if you provide excellent service, your customers will reward you with tips. What's more, the cook will normally give you a feed during your break - free food!

 

3. Working at the university: many students overlook this option but there are many positions available - peer net-workers, tutors, library staff, cafe staff at the university, research assistants ... why go somewhere else when there are jobs up from grabs at your own campus? Be quick though, these positions get snapped up early on in the year.

 

4. Babysitting: Although the idea of looking after some screaming kids doesn't sound immediately appealing, baby-sitting is a great part-time job for students because after bed time, you're free to do as you please - relax, study, research, scroll the internet. You may get the occasional disturbance but depending on the age of the kids, you could have the house to yourself from 8 - 12 midnight. Also, parents often take pity on the 'poor struggling uni students' and will pay you generously.

 

5. Supermarket shelf packers: usually a night-time shift, if you can't afford work during the day or have a hectic university schedule, opt for some shifts packing shelves at your local supermarket. What was your part-time job as a uni student? Was it hard to work around a university schedule? What was the easiest part-time job you had?  

 

6. School tutors: if you're a university student, chances are you have just finished high school. Whilst the school curriculum is still fresh in your mind, advertise yourself and become a tutor for other school students in your local area.

 

7. Lawn mower: How many of your neighbors get someone in to do their lawns? Why not approach them and let them know you're available to do it and throw in an additional 'path sweep' or 'general weeding' for free. That will definitely get them to change their minds about who they're getting to maintain their greens.

 

8. Administration: office assistants, front of desk ... there's always a business in need of some extra hands around the office. The work is usually indoors, not too stressful but enough to keep you busy (and paid).

 

9. Pizza delivery driver: Another good option for students looking for some night shifts. If you know your roads, don't mind sitting in the car, and can stand the smell of freshly baked pizza, then this is a great part-time job for you.

 

10. Call centre operators: usually part-time and casual positions which pay well and teach you important skills - persistence, motivation and excellent customer service.

 

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Think You Hate Your Job? Check Out The 7 Dirtiest Careers!

  Wednesday 23 April, 2014   0 Comment(s)

 

Work in a sterile office all day and think life's a bore? Maybe these jobs will make you think again? 

 

1. Medical waste biohazard cooker

These are the people responsible for collecting the hospital's bags of waste (yep, blood, urine, teeth, you name it) and make them disappear. They put these bags into giant metal canisters' that heat up the materials to about 127 degrees Celsius; ensuring the safe disposal of the hazardous waste. They say it smells and we believe them. 

 

2. Hazmat diver

Hazmat divers regularly swim through toxic sewage dumps, oil spills and other forms of hazardous waste. Their job is to mediate environmental emergencies - and to clean up pollution in our seas and waterways. 

 

3. Blue cheese factory labourer

Blue cheese production labourers have to work daily in a factory filled with rotting cheese and festering mould. They work hard amongst these smells to get the cheese's well-known flavour. Next time you go to a cheese appreciation event, be sure to appreciate those workers as well!

 

4. Crime scene investigator

It's not all fame and fortune like you see on TV. Your job is to track down dead bodies, sometimes decaying for weeks or even months. And when you finally find what you've been looking for, it's time to put your skills to work and that means getting in close to the body and examining it inch by inch for clues.  

 

5. Coursework carcass preparer

They make biology lab assignments possible by killing and preserving small animals for study. All types of animals end up on the lab's table ready for dissection (frogs, sheep parts, cockroaches) and it's their responsibility to make sure it's there. 

 

6. Whale-feces researcher

Yes, you read it right. These researchers examine whale's poo in order to determine things such as: pregnancy, genetics, and hormone measurement. They search for the remains the whales leave behind, floating on the surface of the ocean water. They have about an hour to scoop up as much as they can of the floating load before the poo sinks to the bottom.

 

7. Recycle plant worker

Although it seems pretty straight forward, these guys sort through the mucky stuff with their own hands, pulling out busted dirty nappies, dead rats and half-eaten sandwiches, to separate the recyclable materials. So next time you accidentally through something in the wrong bin, remember the grief you are about to give these guys down at the plant.

 

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The Importance of a Profile Picture for Your Resume

  Tuesday 22 April, 2014   0 Comment(s)

 

It wasn’t long ago that ‘never include a photo in your resume’ was the most common and trusted piece of advice we read about in the career advice blogs and columns. Then came social media, and well, nothing changed. This piece of advice is still being thrown around today. Despite the fact that a quick Google search will return not only a carefully selected photograph but also personal videos and, unless we’re very careful, the most unflattering of happy snaps our “mates” could manage to get a hold of and tag. So, if most of us already include a photo in our LinkedIn profiles, Facebook pages and dating sites, why are we still reluctant about showing our faces to potential employers through our CVs? Those against photos on resumes argue that it looks unprofessional and some even say it makes you look vain. But it’s perfectly acceptable to splash out bikini shots, bathroom selfies and blurred memories detailing events from 18th and 21st birthday parties to your public Facebook profile? Doesn’t sound right. 

 

Now I’m not suggesting you add anything that resembles that sort of content to your professional profiles, but there’s no reason why you shouldn’t embrace the visual, multimedia age we live in and add a professional photograph to complement your CV and give you a competitive edge in the hiring process. 

 

Our top tips for a professional photo:

 

-Use good lighting, which essentially means the lighting is not behind you, making you look like a big silhouette

-Keep both eyes open

-A light and solid background

-A photo of just you

-A shot that lets your face and maybe a little of your neck fill the frame. Crop the photo tightly and then upload it

 

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The Importance of Positive Reinforcement

  Monday 21 April, 2014   0 Comment(s)

 

When an employee performs something exceptionally, managers should be able to recognize that and reward the action in order to encourage a positive pattern in the employee. The reward can come in the form of incentives – both monetary and non-financial – as well as praise or simply showing an appreciation in the employee’s efforts. At work, this type of positive reinforcement can be used to improve the morale of a department or an individual as well as to increase productivity. Here are the main advantages of using positive reinforcement:

 

- It reinforces an employee’s behavior immediately after learning a new technique and promotes quick, thorough learning.

- It clearly defines and communicates expected behaviors and strengthens the connection between high performance and rewards.

- It increases productivity by rewarding workers who conserve time and materials.

- It motivates effective workers to continue to do good work. Lack of reinforcement leads to job dissatisfaction.

- Rewarding employees who suggest improved work procedures will produce more innovation – if you create a relaxed work environment, reward new ideas and tolerate innovative failures.

- Employees who receive recognition for their achievements are more enthusiastic about their work, more cooperative, and more open to change.

- Employees who are rewarded after they successfully perform feel self-confident and become eager to learn new techniques, take advanced training, and accept more responsibility.

- To reinforce successfully, you need to define exactly what it is that constitutes desirable behavior. You should then set specific, measurable work goals with each employee or with the entire team, and then decide together, which behaviors are most important for achieving the results.

- When you show appreciation and reward employees for good work, you increase their job commitment and organizational loyalty.

 

So how do you go about providing positive reinforcement correctly? Here are some tips:

 

1. Be specific in telling the employee what they did well.

2. Reinforce immediately.

3. Be sincere wheen showing appreciation.

4. Reinforce often but unpredictably, without creating patterns or set times for reinforcement.

5. Reward small increments of improvement, not just large goals

6. Give realistic rewards that are proportionate to the importance of the behaviour.

 

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The 4 Parenting Skills to Translate to the Workplace

  Thursday 17 April, 2014   0 Comment(s)

 

Parenting involves a whole new world of skills that childless men and women everywhere cannot fathom. Flexibility, motivational qualities, problem solving, patience and empathy, just to name a few, are valuable not only at home but also I the workplace. The good news is that they’re also easily transferable. 

 

Interpersonal Relations

Whether it’s with your children or your coworkers, dealing with people effectively is a task that requires patience and empathy. Although both these skills would be considered ‘soft skills’ in the business world, they’re essential in the development and cultivation of relationships and the ability to establish and maintain positive relations is seen as a huge asset at work. You can much better understand situations of conflict or any minor obstacles with empathy and patience.

 

Leadership Skills

Whatever your line of work may be, when at home, you’re the leader or ‘the managing director’ of the household. Raising kids involves exploring what works in motivating them to succeed – money, praise and even the threat of punishment are tools you’ve tested and you’ve probably found that different children respond differently to eat of these. Being capable of understanding motivators is a quality tied directly to the workplace. And it’s not just one you will use in a management capacity. Learning about what motivates your coworkers and other stakeholders will give you a huge advantage.

 

Teaching

While your children learn from you and other adults in their lives, adults need teaching too – and the lessons learnt often come from other adults in the workplace. While at home you might teach your children about practical things like tying shoelaces and theoretical lessons about values and discipline such as how to handle other people’s behaviour, at work, both of these types of teaching techniques will be put to the test when you’re faced with a new colleague or if you’re training someone about something new. Bring your own previous experiences in both roles to help with problem solving.

 

Time Management

No job description is complete without the specification of time management skills. It’s no surprise that this is an area in which mums and dads gain an advantage in the workplace. Getting kids out of bed, into uniform, at the table and out the door each morning and reversing the process every night, while squeezing in a hundred other chores and errands in between is no easy feat. But these routines make parents conscious of short deadlines and time management in general because multi-tasking, flexibility and prioritization skills are essential in on the work front as well as in the home.

 

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The Top 10 Part-Time Jobs for Students

  Thursday 17 April, 2014   0 Comment(s)

 

There are many part-time jobs for university students - just a quick glance at OneShift will prove this. Part-time or casual jobs are good options for students because they are flexible enough to allow an individual time both for studying and earning money. Part-time jobs can also provide an individual with valuable skills for their future career. With so many part-time jobs out there, we have made a shortlist of the top ten casual jobs for students:

 

1. Bartenders: Working at a bar requires a RSA (Responsible Service of Alcohol Certificate) and RCG (Responsible Conduct of Gambling Certificate) but these are relatively cheap and easy to obtain. The course for both certificates usually lasts a day and costs around $200. Bar work is great for students as the shifts are usually at night and on the weekends - outside of university hours. The pay is also good -  $20-25 an hour with extra if your hours are late at night or on Sunday. Lastly, it's relatively easy, social work. You get to speak with the bar locals, university students and foreign travelers.

 

2. Wait staff: Working in a restaurant or a cafe is a good option for students as businesses in the hospitality sector hire regularly and there are often many part-time and casual positions available. Hours are usually in the morning, lunch time or dinner - usually for no more than four hours depending on what meal you are helping with. The pay is usually not as good as bar work however if you provide excellent service, your customers will reward you with tips. What's more, the cook will normally give you a feed during your break - free food!

 

3. Working at the university: many students overlook this option but there are many positions available - peer net-workers, tutors, library staff, cafe staff at the university, research assistants ... why go somewhere else when there are jobs up from grabs at your own campus? Be quick though, these positions get snapped up early on in the year.

 

4. Babysitting: Although the idea of looking after some screaming kids doesn't sound immediately appealing, baby-sitting is a great part-time job for students because after bed time, you're free to do as you please - relax, study, research, scroll the internet. You may get the occasional disturbance but depending on the age of the kids, you could have the house to yourself from 8 - 12 midnight. Also, parents often take pity on the 'poor struggling uni students' and will pay you generously.

 

5. Supermarket shelf packers: usually a night-time shift, if you can't afford work during the day or have a hectic university schedule, opt for some shifts packing shelves at your local supermarket. What was your part-time job as a uni student? Was it hard to work around a university schedule? What was the easiest part-time job you had?  

 

6. School tutors: if you're a university student, chances are you have just finished high school. Whilst the school curriculum is still fresh in your mind, advertise yourself and become a tutor for other school students in your local area.

 

7. Lawn mower: How many of your neighbors get someone in to do their lawns? Why not approach them and let them know you're available to do it and throw in an additional 'path sweep' or 'general weeding' for free. That will definitely get them to change their minds about who they're getting to maintain their greens.

 

8. Administration: office assistants, front of desk ... there's always a business in need of some extra hands around the office. The work is usually indoors, not too stressful but enough to keep you busy (and paid).

 

9. Pizza delivery driver: Another good option for students looking for some night shifts. If you know your roads, don't mind sitting in the car, and can stand the smell of freshly baked pizza, then this is a great part-time job for you.

 

10. Call centre operators: usually part-time and casual positions which pay well and teach you important skills - persistence, motivation and excellent customer service.

 

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The 4 Things You Should Do in Your First Week at a New Workplace

  Wednesday 16 April, 2014   0 Comment(s)

 

If you’re starting a new job – whether it is your first job or if you’re switching companies – transitioning to a new place of work can be testing, even for the most flexible among us. The unique culture, policies and the whole environment itself can vary immensely from one company to another and signs of what’s to come don’t always show during the interview stage or even in the first few days of training on the job. But the quicker you grasp a sense of what the company is about, the quicker and smoother your transition into it will be.

 

Clear Expectations

Adjusting to a new workplace is much easier for a new employee who listens carefully and takes notes both during the interview and when on the job. This sense of the culture will give the employee a taste of what the position is about and how the rest of the team interacts with the person in the role. The adjustment period will take less time if the expectations of both parties are made clear from the start.

 

Observing and Listening

During the first few weeks of employment in a new company, the listening skills and learning skills of a new employee play an enormous part in their success and development within the role. Take notes about any specific details about the business during the training period, ask plenty of questions and watch what other employees are doing and how they go about their days. Being conscious of the details will help you fit in and adapt to the company culture, as well as demonstrate a willingness to and a team-focus.

 

Forming Alliances

Finding a friendly colleague or, better yet, a mentor in your department early on can give you the advantage of learning about prioritising tasks that are expected of you correctly. Meanwhile, the HR department is always there to help you with company policies, the work environment and they can point you in the right direction when you need help with a more specific task. Set time for lunch or coffee with newfound contacts in any related departments can also help you broaden your perspective on the company.

 

Employee Manual

Most companies will have some sort of employee manual containing all the information you won’t hear from your work buddies. It’s a good point of reference and will come in handy in the future if any issues were to arise so make a point of grabbing a copy for yourself during your first week. 

 

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8 Surefire Signs It's Time to Quit Your Job

  Tuesday 15 April, 2014   0 Comment(s)

 

Although sticking it out in a less-than-desirable position could be necessary to rise up the corporate ladder, not every job you have will exactly meet “dream job” standards. As time goes on, you may realise that your job is not worth the time and energy you’re putting in, especially if your health and wellbeing are at risk because of it.

 

But how will you know when it’s time to quit and move on? Here are the top ten warning signs you need to look out for:

 

1. You’ve stopped learning

You have hit a brick wall at your job if you continue to develop your existing skills but find that you’re bored because you’re not picking up anything new. 

 

2. You’re not reaching your potential

It’s definitely worth considering your options if you’ve realised that you’re overqualified for your current role and not utilising and expanding your existing skillset.

 

3. You hate the work

While some jobs require you to ‘work your way up’ by doing the undesirable jobs for a while as a sort of stepping stone, others are simply not fit for you. One way to know is to look at your manager and their manager and consider whether you’d be happy doing what they do. 

 

4. You don't fit in with the company culture

You need to find a work environment suited to your own personality. If you find that after a few months of working for the company, you still feel like an outcast, it might not be setting for your development.

 

5. Your boss is awful

A bad boss can be a bully, arrogant, and a poor team manager. If his or her shortcomings are affecting your productivity and happiness, it might not be worth putting up with.

 

6. Your company is going under

If an upcoming acquisition or merger is threatening your position or your department, or if your company is generally following a downward spiral and struggling financially, you may be going down with a sinking ship.

 

7. Your job is affecting your mental/physical health 

Unhappiness in the workplace can lead to physical symptoms such as body aches and panic attacks as well as anxiety, stress and depression. If it’s come to this point, you need to put yourself first and look elsewhere.

 

8. Your relationship with your partner/family/friends is suffering

When you notice that you’re starting to drift away from your loved ones because of the long hours you’re putting in at work or because you’re under too much stress because of your job, it could be time to weigh up the rewards versus the costs.

 

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The 5 Things Bosses Must Never Do When Firing an Employee

  Monday 14 April, 2014   0 Comment(s)

 

A dismissal at work is stressful for everyone involved- not just the employee being fired. Managers need to be capable of communicating any issues regarding performance long before they make the decision to let someone go. The problem is that even when managers do communicate this, some staff members tend to have a trouble receiving the message. After all, nobody wants to believe that he or she is about to get sacked. So an employer’s sensitivity to the situation is key when the time does come. Don’t make the following mistakes next time you need to terminate an employee:

 

1. Don't make a scene.

Dismissing someone publicly is not an effective way to scare your staff into picking up their performance. These tactics do little more than demoralise the team and create a culture of fear. As difficult as it may be, try to put yourself in their shoes – would you want to be treated that way? Even if you have no choice but to lay off people, pull the individual aside and privately discuss the situation with clarity, giving evidence of why it’s necessary.

 

2. Don't ignore the absence.

In a small to medium sized team, letting go of an employee doesn’t involve just them but the rest of the staff too, so they must be included accordingly. Obviously not at the same time but do pull the remaining team members aside on the first day that the ex-employee is no longer there and discuss what has happened and what needs to happen next, including any new procedures or practices that must be taken on during this period of transition.

 

3. Don’t do it on the phone.

Make plans to have the conversation in person, even if this is inconvenient for you. Try to empathise with the person who is about to become unemployed because this conversation is much more about them than it is about you. Expect and prepare for their questions, which they’ll no doubt want answered face-to-face in a meeting and they do deserve as much.

 

4. Don’t send someone else to do your dirty work.

Basically, if you hired the employee, you should be the one to tell them they’re being let go. It’s never good practice to have someone else do the task. Not only does it make you look like a coward- it’s disrespectful and none of the remaining team members will think highly of you for doing it.

 

5. Don’t lie

If you lie to them about the reason they’re being fired or if you tell them that you didn’t really want to do this when you did, they will see right through you and they’ll resent you for it in the future. Be honest and try to give your reasons in a constructive tone rather than an insulting one and be gentle when breaking the news, focusing on the best way to allow them to process the information.

 

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How to Enter Your 30s with a Clean Financial Slate

  Friday 11 April, 2014   0 Comment(s)

 

Many people in their 20s often say things like “life is short”, “YOLO”, and many other made up juvenile phrases to excuse themselves from the responsibility of saving money and making wise investments.

 

According to a 2013 study by Barclays and charity pfeg (Personal Finance Education Group), people under 25 are showing worrying gaps in their financial knowledge relating to bank statements, overdrafts and interest on loans. So it’s no wonder that young people make some stupid mistakes during their early-mid twenties. Avoid these common issues by considering the following tips:

 

Be tight fisted with your money

Don't easily part with your money. Coffee, sodas, smoothies, fast food and vending machine treats can easily add up to $400 a month.

 

Think economically

When the going gets tough, the tough get frugal. Grab a ride to work, bring lunch, take the bus and do whatever you can to avoid breaking out your wallet.

 

Obtain and keep a good credit rating

The better your credit history, the more likely you are to be granted a loan with a competitive interest rate.

 

Choose the right flatmate

Sharing an apartment with a roommate saves thousands of dollars a year. But make sure you choose one who will pay the rent on time and be a helping hand, not a liability.

 

Keep your overheads low

Are you paying $25 per week on a gym membership you don't use? Or maybe you still have that subscription to that magazine you read 5 years ago. Many people waste money on subscriptions they rarely use and never cancel.

 

Lock money away

Set up a high interest savings account that rewards you if you don’t withdraw. Use a different bank for it and don't get a debit card.

 

Learn to cook

You don’t need to be Nigella to know your way around the kitchen. All you have to do is learn a few very basic cooking skills to make some simple meals that that can save you hundreds of dollars each week.

 

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